Main Verb used should be present participle (‘ing’ form) followed respectively by the Object and Time frame. In negative sentences, we may contract the first auxiliary verb and "not": The Past Perfect Continuous tense is like the Past Perfect tense, but it expresses longer actions in the past before another action in the past. Before we move forward, let us understand the use of since and for. Notice that this is related to the present perfect continuous; however, the duration does not continue until now, it stops before something else in the past. Questions are indicated by inverting the subject and had. The past perfect continuous is formed using had + been + present participle. Present Perfect, Past Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, and Past Perfect Continuous, Present and Past Tenses with Non-Continuous Verbs. e.g. Checkout English Summary's free educational tools and dictionaries. NOTE: Passive forms of the past perfect continuous are not common. Past perfect continuous tense Home > Grammar & vocabulary resources > Grammar rules > List of all English tenses > Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Online quiz to test your understanding of the Past Perfect Continuous tense in English. The structure of the Past Perfect Continuous tense is: The first auxiliary verb (have) is conjugated in the Past Simple, invariable: had, The second auxiliary verb (be) is invariable in past participle form: been, The main verb is invariable in present participle form: -ing. Everything else remains same as in positive sentences i.e. (We can also use the past perfect simple here, often with stative verbs.) For example, imagine that you meet Ram at 11am. We assume that you have learned the forms of verbs and their meanings in this unit and are also aware of What is Tense. For negative sentences we insert not after the first auxiliary verb. e.g. since 9 O’Clock, since Wednesday, since January, since 2013, since morning, etc. mixed verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Non-continuous verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Let us now understand the structure of the sentence in Past Perfect Continuous Tense. This tense has thus a specific time mentioned. In Past Perfect Continuous Tense, we use had been with He, She, It, I, We, You, They and Name and -ing form of the verb (present participle form) and time by using since or for.Here is the basic structure of Past Perfect Continuous Tense: I arrived at 11am. This is a verb tense in English and it shows us that an action started sometime in the past and continues up to another time in the past. Hence we use. Now that we have understood the use of since and for.Let us now understand the structure of the sentence in Past Perfect Continuous Tense. For example: You can sometimes think of the Past Perfect Continuous tense like the Present Perfect Continuous tense, but instead of the time being now the time is before. It is important to remember that Look at these example sentences with the Past Perfect Continuous tense: When we use the Past Perfect Continuous in speaking, we often contract the subject and the first auxiliary verb. Study the examples below to understand the difference. Past perfect continuous: They complained, "We have been waiting for hours". Read on for detailed descriptions, examples, and present perfect continuous exercises. I arrived at 11am. The past perfect continuous (also called past perfect progressive) is a verb tense which is used to show that an action started in the past and continued up to another point in the past. The Past Perfect Continuous tense is like the Past Perfect tense, but it expresses longer actions in the past before another action in the past. The Past Perfect Continuous Tense. For example: Ram started waiting at 9am. Instead of using past perfect continuous with these verbs, you must use past perfect. The Past Perfect Continuous is another tense that expresses the "past in the past". e.g. Ram says to you: © 1997-2020 EnglishClub.com All Rights ReservedThe world's premier FREE educational website for learners + teachers of EnglishEngland • since 1997, Ram started waiting at 9am. Please look at the following image for the recap. She had been working at that company for a year when she met James. Negatives are made with not, Complete List of Past Perfect Continuous Forms. In this tense, we use had and -ing form (present participle form) of the verb and mention time using since or for. Past Perfect Continuous Tense Past Perfect Progressive tense is used to describe an ongoing action that started in past and continued for some time in past. In Past Perfect Continuous Tense, we use the, This tense has a specific time mentioned. if not, please click these links and learn them first. In this lesson we look at the structure and use of the Past Perfect Continuous tense, followed by a quiz to check your understanding. If you do not include a duration such as "for five minutes," "for two weeks" or "since Friday," many English speakers choose to use the past continuous rather than the past perfect continuous. The past perfect continuous (also called past perfect progressive) is a verb tense which is used to show that an action started in the past and continued up to another point in the past. Rules for Negative Sentences in Past Perfect Continuous Form To make the sentence negative ‘had been’ is replaced by ‘had not been’. Past continuous emphasizes interrupted actions, whereas past perfect continuous emphasizes a duration of time before something in the past. In Hindi/Urdu, Past Perfect Continuous Tense ends with se raha tha, se rahi thi, se rhe the. past: present: future: when we don’t know the exact time, date, week, month, year, etc. Now that we have understood the use of since and for. for 7 hours, for 9 days, for 4 weeks, for several months, for many years, etc. Be careful because this can change the meaning of the sentence. when we know the exact time, day, month, week, year, etc. It. Wo kal se Khana kha raha tha. In Past Perfect Continuous Tense, we use had been with He, She, It, I, We, You, They and Name and -ing form of the verb (present participle form) and time by using since or for. This action can be finished or unfinished. Now that we have understood the basics of Past Perfect Continuous Tense, let us memorize what we have learned. Past continuous: ... You do not need to change the tense if the reporting verb is in the present, or if the original statement was about something that is still true, e.g. Since is used for point of time i.e. In the previous unit, we have discussed the Past Perfect Tense in detail.