Indeed, during his lifetime he made ends meet with his talent for drawing, painting, and illustrating. Many of the words are monosyllables, except for the word 'angry' which is two and is repeated twice for emphasis. Sign in, choose your GCSE subjects and see content that's tailored for you. ...Poem Analysis - A Poison Tree John Doe Studies in Poetry Professor: Frank Franks June 20, 2012 Cross-Cultural Realities at Work A Poison Tree is a poem by William Blake. It is written in quatrains. In deceptively simple language with an almost nursery-rhyme quality, the speaker of the poem details two different approaches to anger. The original thinker William Blake in his poem “The Poison Tree” talks about how devastating and ruinous the bottled up anger can be. Although it resembles a children’s poem in rhyming and the four-line stanzas, it still carries a message that can be closely connected to today’s world, especially when people in this era are increasingly alienating themselves from others and as a result all their frustrations are never dealt with, only bottled-up. This metamorphosis of anger into something that is incredibly vengeful and spiteful alludes to the fact that how something that might have been trivial in the beginning grew in vigor and became destructive. different views, what message might be taken from reading the poem? In the first stanza, “anger” and “wrath” are used interchangeably. Registered office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE, Language and Structure for A Poison Tree - William Blake. 7 of the 12 lines begin with 'and' to build and increase intensity. 806 8067 22, Registered office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE, GCSE Edexcel English Literature Conflict poems », I can offer help in these subject areas: », WJEC English Literature A2 Exam 11th June 2015 », How to get grade 8/9 in English Language or Literature ?! And into my garden stole. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. When the night had veiled the pole; In the morning glad I see, My foe outstretchd beneath the tree. The speaker’s pent up anger grew and became a fruit-bearing full-fledged tree. any key words which stand out for you. The lines in the first stanza all start with 'I' which emphasises that this is a personal story told from an individual point of view. By clicking "Log In", you agree to our terms quatrains, rhythm and rhyme scheme emphasises simplicity, use of extended metaphor of tree, simple vocabulary. Then one morning, the speaker discovers his enemy underneath the tree – dead, eaten away by the speaker’s abhorrence. And I watered it in fears, Night and morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. © Copyright Get Revising 2020 all rights reserved. Get Revising is one of the trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd. Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. And it grew both day and night, Till it bore an apple bright. In this way, the anger vanished away. », English Literature - Poems - A Poison Tree, GCSE English Literature paper 2:Poetry-Power and Conflict, POWER AND CONFLICT - POETRY (DETAILED ANALYSIS). Read about our approach to external linking. Make sure you use these key words in your essay. Compare his approach to that used by Mary Lamb in the poem, Love and Friendship by Emily Brontë - OCR, The Destruction of Sennacherib by Lord Byron - OCR, What Were They Like? A Poison Tree deals with a key human emotion - anger. The poem A Poison Tree by William Blake is about the ill and corrupted effects of anger.The poet tells us how that once he was angry with his friend and told him about it. A Poison Tree a poem by William Blake I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. there is a definite message but open to different interpretations, clarity achieved through simplicity and directness. The speaker does not dilly-dally and launches right away to tell us that he once bore a grudge against a friend. Diana from A Research Guide Don't know how to start your paper? This poem follows the structure of a nursery rhyme, though it delivers a message that is true for everyone. Comparisons and alternative interpretations are also considered. Conclude with a firm judgement about the poem. 806 8067 22 By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy. Eventually the anger took the form and shape of “an apple bright”. "A Poison Tree" is a poem by English poet William Blake, first published in his Songs of Experience in 1794. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. How does William Blake make his message clear in A Poison Tree? Tree – As in The Human Abstract, the tree growing in A Poison Tree is an all-encompassing growth in the mind which is dark, evil and deceitful, resulting in physical and spiritual death. The grouping of sets of four lines. One of the primal themes of this poem is anger. There are four stanzas. I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. Structure. The “apple” and the “tree” and the ruination that it brought along alludes to the poet’s own depiction of the original sin. Form. Form, Structure and Language. All rights reserved. A good approach to begin with is to highlight any key words which stand out for you. Make sure you use these key words in your essay. Each stanza has a rhyming couplet. Mention a range of views or perspectives. Get professional writing assistance from our partner. The poem’s content, ideas, language and structure are explored. But it died once he had shared his feelings with his friend. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. However, he also bore grudge against an enemy, but his failure to air his grievance caused that anger to gradually flourish as he “watered it in fears”. William Blake’s “A Poison Tree” was published in 1794 as a part of his poetry collection in “Songs of Experience”. The poem’s content, ideas, language and structure are explored. Follows a rhyming pattern of AABB. And I waterd it in fears, Night & morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. © Copyright Get Revising 2020 all rights reserved. However, on the other hand, he was angry over his enemy too but because he never told him about it, the anger kept growing in his mind against him (enemy). The speaker employs anaphora as he starts all the lines in the first stanza using “I”, lending emphasis to the fact that nurturing a grudge has made him selfish. “A Poison Tree” Poetry Analysis “A Poison Tree”, by William Blake is a poem of four stanzas, with a rhyme scheme of aa-bb-cc-dd-ee-ff-gg-hh, and in which the poet examines the negative effects of unresolved anger. A Poison Tree. The speaker constantly feed and nurtured his hatred and it grew like a tree that bore a grand apple. Click to learn more, Works Cited, References, and Bibliography. Go on to mention themes, form, structure, rhythm and language. examining a basic human emotion which can be felt by anyone. Some other essay questions to think about: Our team of exam survivors will get you started and keep you going. Blake cleverly presents this idea by way of an extended metaphor in order to make the point that if you let anger fester and build up, deplorable actions may occur. Get Revising is one of the trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd. Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. A Poison Tree Introduction. Comparisons and alternative interpretations are also considered. Simplest and most recognizable of poetic forms. The speaker’s pent up anger grew and became a fruit-bearing full-fledged tree. Soft – When allied with ‘wiles', this implies a sense of luxurious pleasure taken by the speaker as s/he seeks to deceive the enemy.